• Grant award from @FundlaCaixa to survey the willingness to move for jobs in Spain

I have recently been awarded a grant to support social research projects based on surveys from the Observatori Social de la Caixa.

Project title: Understanding the low willingness to move for jobs across regions in Spain.

Project summary:

Despite the wide implications of (interregional) migration for the functioning of the labour market, we still have a poor understanding of what drives job-related mobility and immobility decisions. Little motivation to accept job offers elsewhere can be driven by demand-side factors (e.g. suboptimal employment opportunities) as well as by supply-side factors (e.g. skill mismatches, family situation), but the associated impacts have rarely been dissociated in empirical research because studies often rely on observations after migration occurred rather than on observations of the prior decision-making process.

The objective of this study is to gather novel evidence on the drivers of job-related, interregional migration in Spain. Complementing previous analyses of migration occurrences, we propose to examine the individuals’ willingness to move for a job elsewhere, and to scrutiny how relevant are for mobility the characteristics of job offers, the capacities and skills of the workforce, and the economic and social costs that migrating entail among other relevant factors. The proposed survey will inquire a representative sample (N=4,000) of the Spanish labour force in September-October 2019. We also innovate by implementing as part of the survey an experimental module (factorial survey) where respondents are asked to evaluate their willingness to accept hypothetical job offers (vignettes) that differ in experimentally varied characteristics.

By improving our understanding of the willingness to move for a job, the project addresses the fundamental and urgent problematic of matching workers to jobs that any labour market, particularly the Spanish one, suffers. Some key questions that we can better answer with the proposed project are: How attractive should be the employment conditions that make people accept job offers in other regions? What are the personal resources and characteristics that make some people more willing than others to accept (better) jobs elsewhere? And for the design of policies: what are the key levers to pull to improve matches between labour supply and demand, and to achieve optimal levels of workforce mobility?

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•New publication: #Gender differences in willingness to move for #interregional job offers – by Abraham, Bähr & Trapmann @UniFAU @iab_news – special collection @DemographicRes

The study by Martin Abraham, Sebastian Bähr and Mark Trapmann revisits the question of why partnered women persistently migrate less often for a job than partnered men and single women.

Titled Gender differences in willingness to move for interregional job offers, the article innovates by examining the differences between men and women in assessing the attractiveness of a job-related household move.

Using an experimental factorial survey approach, results show evidence for partnered women displaying a lower willingness to move than men. Factors proposed by standard theories (particularly gender norms) partly predict these gender differences, but not all of them.

Findings of this research are suggestive for a further need of theoretical development to explain persistence of gender gaps in family migration decisions and outcomes.

This publication is part of the Special Collection in Demographic Research titled ‘Spatial Mobility, Family Dynamics and Gender Relations,’ organized by Guest Editors Sergi Vidal (Centre for Demographic Studies, Barcelona) and Johannes Huinink (University of Bremen).

The collection of papers addresses relevant intersections across three interrelated areas – spatial mobility, family life courses and contexts, and gender relations. It revisits these associations offering new evidence from longitudinal data collections, showcasing state-of-the-art analytical methods to obtain better estimates of the associations, and expanding research horizons by identifying under-researched areas and proposing new research perspectives.

More papers of this collection are coming out soon!

  • You can find this publication (in open access) here.

•New publication: Changes in #gender role attitudes following couples’ residential relocations – by myself & @PMLersch – special collection @DemographicRes

Residential relocations of couple households are associated with increases in objective gender inequality within families in paid and unpaid work. Little is known about how couples’ relocations affect subjective outcomes such as attitudes.

To close gaps in knowledge, Philipp Lersch (Humbold University & DIW, Berlin) and I examine whether gender role attitudes change when families move residentially in Britain, empirically addressing potential explanations. We also assess heterogeneity in outcomes by relocation distance and relocation motive.

Using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Study (1991-2007), we find that gender role attitudes were not significantly altered following a couple’s relocation. As an exception, we find that when couples exclusively relocated for the female partner’s job, men’s gender role attitudes became more egalitarian post-relocation. Preliminary evidence also suggests that women’s gender role attitudes are potentially affected by their exposure to residential contexts.

Despite widespread evidence regarding increases in objective gender inequality following couple relocations in Britain, our findings suggest that this does not permeate into subjective outcomes such as attitudes. Beyond expanding the knowledge on subjective sources of gender inequality that follow couples’ relocations, our results also contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of change in gender role attitudes over the life course.

This publication is part of the Special Collection in Demographic Research titled ‘Spatial Mobility, Family Dynamics and Gender Relations,’ organized by Guest Editors Sergi Vidal (Centre for Demographic Studies, Barcelona) and Johannes Huinink (University of Bremen).

The collection of papers addresses relevant intersections across three interrelated areas – spatial mobility, family life courses and contexts, and gender relations. It revisits these associations offering new evidence from longitudinal data collections, showcasing state-of-the-art analytical methods to obtain better estimates of the associations, and expanding research horizons by identifying under-researched areas and proposing new research perspectives.

More papers of this collection are coming out soon!

  • You can find this publication (in open access) here.

•New publication: #Gender -specific effects of #commuting and relocation on a couple’s social life – by N.Nisic @unipb &S. Kley @unihh – in our special collection @DemographicRes

Building on the relevance of the extended family and non-kin relations for social integration, Natascha Nisic (Paderborn University) and Stefanie Kley (Hamburg University) how long-distance commuting and relocations affect these relationships for partnered men and women in their paper titled Gender-specific effects of commuting and relocation on a couple’s social life.

Using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Study (1997-2008), they find that while spatial mobility of men do not affect social relationships substantively, the spatial mobility of women has impacts on the quantity and quality of social relationships. In line with arguments about domesticity and the role of women as kinkeepers and managers of social relationships, the authors discuss these and other relevant results.

These results shed further light on gender asymmetries in the outcomes of couples’ spatial mobility that spill over into other areas of life beyond the labour market.

This publication is part of the Special Collection in Demographic Research titled ‘Spatial Mobility, Family Dynamics and Gender Relations,’ organized by Guest Editors Sergi Vidal (Centre for Demographic Studies) and Johannes Huinink (University of Bremen).

The collection of papers addresses relevant intersections across three interrelated areas – spatial mobility, family life courses and contexts, and gender relations. It revisits these associations offering new evidence from longitudinal data collections, showcasing state-of-the-art analytical methods to obtain better estimates of the associations, and expanding research horizons by identifying under-researched areas and proposing new research perspectives.

More papers of this collection are coming out soon!

  • You can find Nisic and Kley’s publication (in open access) here.

•Reports from the “Giving voice to the #unemployed and the #precarious workers of #Barcelona” project out now

The objective of the project Giving voice to the unemployed and the precarious workers of Barcelona is to improve our understanding of vulnerability associated to situations of unemployment and labour precariousness. This is an original research project born from a collaboration between social movements and some members of the Pompeu Fabra University and the Centre for Demographic Studies.

We conducted two surveys in 2018. Respondents were asked about their situations of vulnerability in present and past employment and unemployment episodes as well as relevant correlates such as health, family situation and daily life, political attitudes, opinions about the causes of unemployment and employment as well as possible interventions to reverse vulnerability.

Results of this project have been published in two comprehensive reports (in Spanish) that are available here and here.

•Los informes del proyecto “Donem veu als #aturats i #precaris de #Barcelona” ya están a vuestra disposición!

El proyecto Donem veu als aturats i precaris de Barcelona tiene como objetivo conocer y profundizar las situaciones de desempleo y precariedad.

El proyecto nace de una propuesta de trabajadores afectados por el paro y agrupados en l’Assemblea de Treballadors aturats de Barcelona, junto con la iniciativa de l’Eix de Treballs i Precarietat de Barcelona en Comú y de la posibilidad de destinar unos recursos económicos que facilita Procés Constituent. Finalmente, también colaboran otras entidades relacionadas con la precariedad y la vulnerabilidad y que colaboran con Bcomú.

A través de dos encuestas realizadas en el año 2018, se pregunto acerca de la vulnerabilidad que yace de la situación de desempleo y/o del empleo actual y anterior de los entrevistados; también sobre su percepción de salud, situación familiar y de la vida cotidiana, así como sobre la actitud frente a las asociaciones y las movilizaciones; también la opinión sobre el desempleo y el trabajo y, asimismo, acerca de las posibles respuestas y alternativas.

Los resultados de este proyecto han sido publicados en dos informes que están disponibles aquí y aquí.

•New publication: Does moving for family nest-building inhibit mothers’ labour force (re-)entry? by S. Kley @unihh & S. Drobnič @BIGSSS_Bremen – in our special collection @DemographicRes

Studies unwrapping the persisting gender inequalities that follow family moves have often focused on long-distance relocations, but most moves in connection with starting a family are over short distances. These moves place young families in suburban or rural neighbourhoods and increase commuting distance, which often inhibits mother’s labour force participation.

Stefanie Kley (University of Hamburg) and Sonja Drobnic (BIGSSS; University of Bremen) ask the question Does Moving for Family Nest-Building Inhibit Mothers’ Labour Force (Re-)Entry? to examine the female labour market outcomes of first-time mothers’ relocations around childbirth.

Using German longitudinal data from the Socio-Economic Panel (1999–2014) and event-history analysis, they find strong evidence for the hypothesis that moving around first childbirth impedes mothers’ employment; particularly hampering entering part-time jobs, the domain of working mothers in Germany.

Their findings highlight the significance of family processes as mechanisms for persisting gender inequalities in the labour market following under-researched short-distance relocations.

This publication is part of the Special Collection in Demographic Research titled ‘Spatial Mobility, Family Dynamics and Gender Relations,’ organized by Guest Editors Sergi Vidal (Centre for Demographic Studies) and Johannes Huinink (University of Bremen).

The collection of papers addresses relevant intersections across three interrelated areas – spatial mobility, family life courses and contexts, and gender relations. It revisits these associations offering new evidence from longitudinal data collections, showcasing state-of-the-art analytical methods to obtain better estimates of the associations, and expanding research horizons by identifying under-researched areas and proposing new research perspectives.

More papers of this collection are coming out soon!

  • You can find Kley and Drobnič’s publication (in open access) here.

• New publication: Ties to non-resident family, internal migration and immobility by Clara Mulder @FRW_RUG – part of our special collection in @DemographicRes

New publication by Clara H Mulder in Demographic Research titled ‘Putting family centre stage: Ties to non-resident family, internal migration, and immobility.’

In this paper, Mulder proposes a novel perspective and presents a research agenda to advance knowledge on the role of families outside the household for internal migration and immobility.

Working with the premise that geographic proximity is crucial to family support, Mulder extends cost-benefit approaches of migration to include ties to family living outside the household. Mulder persuasively argues how spatial mobility and immobility are related to the linked lives of family members, and how these vary across individuals, life course stages and contexts. Without doubt, Mulder´s contribution traces the path to future researchers who aim to unveil the relevant associations and the underlying mechanisms that link family lives with spatial mobility behaviour and outcomes.

This publication is part of the Special Collection ‘Spatial Mobility, Family Dynamics and Gender Relations,’ organized by Guest Editors Sergi Vidal (Centre for Demographic Studies) and Johannes Huinink (University of Bremen).

The collection of papers addresses relevant intersections across three interrelated areas – spatial mobility, family life courses and contexts, and gender relations. It revisits these associations offering new evidence from longitudinal data collections, showcasing state-of-the-art analytical methods to obtain better estimates of the associations, and expanding research horizons by identifying under-researched areas and proposing new research perspectives.

More papers of this collection are coming out soon!

  • You can find Clara H Mulder’s publication (in open access) here.

• Moving home not a major determinant of #children´s academic performance, but contexts matter – new research in LLCS

New paper (with Janeen Baxter) in Longitudinal and Life Course Studies titled ‘Residential relocations and academic performance of Australian children: A longitudinal analysis.’
Together with Professor Janeen Baxter, I use data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) and the National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) to examine the associations between residential relocations and academic performance.

Our findings indicate that, under certain conditions, residential relocations are moderately associated with school performance. Results showed that children who relocate often (3 or more times) display worse school performance, but this association is explained by characteristics of the home and family context. In contrast children who relocate moderately (1-2 times) display better school performance after controlling for other things.Overall, while changing residence is not in itself a major determinant of academic performance, the contexts and environments where children are embedded matter. Relocations that are detrimental for academic performance are embedded in contexts of disadvantage, suggesting that policies aimed at supporting disadvantaged families may widely benefit children’s cognitive development.

You can find their journal paper here and a pre-publication here

•New research on internal migration over the life course across cohorts in Germany on-line in ALCR – Check now the free e-offprint

The structure of the transition to adulthood has profoundly changed in recent decades, in ways that have affected the relevance of internal migration for the individual life course.

In my new research article titled “Internal migration over young adult life courses: Continuities and changes across cohorts in West Germany” (in Advances in Life Course Research; with Katharina Lutz), I adopt a paradigm that examines the life course holistically to portray internal migration as part of unfolding individual life courses during the young adulthood, analyzing stability and change across socio-historical contexts.

We first address the question of whether the structure of family and occupational life courses intersect with internal migration processes at early adult ages for men and women born in 1939-41, 1949-51, 1964 and 1971. We then establish how socio-historical transformations are reflected in the life course pathways of internal migrants. We  accomplish this by analyzing key features of sequences of monthly records of life events between the ages of 16 and 30 from the German Life History Study.

Results from our analyses reveal that the structure of individual life courses intersects with internal migration experiences in early adulthood. These differences have increased over time and are more apparent in the labour market trajectory than in the family trajectory. In particular, longer education episodes, fewer and shorter employment episodes, and fewer or later family-related episodes associate more with internal migration than lack thereof over the life course, and across recent generations.

We also find a relevant diversity in internal migrants’ trajectories, which reflects the complex ways in which young adults negotiate life courses, and it aligns with the generalized protraction of school-to-work transitions and the delay of family projects across birth cohorts.

Our research adds to recent studies that underline the value of situating migration events in the wider biographical and structural contexts. Findings contribute to map in efficient ways the full complexity of individual life courses.

Free e-offprint available here until May 25, 2018.